"…mais ce serait peut-être l'une des plus grandes opportunités manquées de notre époque si le logiciel libre ne libérait rien d'autre que du code…"

Archive for the ‘jython’ Category

PythonC 2.6 for Java : Py4J 0.4 is out

Posted by patrick sur septembre 19, 2010

Py4j (http://py4j.sourceforge.net/index.html)

Py4J enables Python programs running in a Python interpreter to dynamically access Java objects in a Java Virtual Machine. Methods are called as if the Java objects resided in the Python interpreter and Java collections can be accessed through standard Python collection methods. Py4J also enables Java programs to call back Python objects. Py4J is distributed under the BSD license.

py4j

See also

http://www.jython.org/index.html (« Python for the Java Platform »)

Py4J enables Python programs running in a Python interpreter to dynamically access Java objects in a Java Virtual Machine. Methods are called as if the Java objects resided in the Python interpreter and Java collections can be accessed through standard Python collection methods. Py4J also enables Java programs to call back Python objects. Py4J is distributed under the BSD license.
Publicités

Posted in 2010, Années, Documentation, java, jython, Langages, python, Sphinx | Tagué: , , | Leave a Comment »

Quelques articles sur des frameworks Web Python : Django, Pylons, Web2py, Repoze.bfg, Pyxer

Posted by patrick sur février 8, 2009

Sources:

  • http://plope.com/whats_your_web_framework_doing (‘It can be a bit useless to benchmark web application frameworks. When you’re commmitted to a particular framework, either it works or it doesn’t for your particular application; often raw speed is not really a concern. You’re probably not going to switch web frameworks in the middle of a project in order to get a 15% or even a 50% or 100% speed increase: you’ve got too much investment in the code that works under the framework to consider it. In my experience, very few people truly understand more than one web framework, and they tend to use that framework for everything even it it’s slightly less optimal for any specific task; this is because the « switching cost » to go to another one is so high. So benchmarks aren’t really all that interesting in the « real » web world; it all depends on context. But if you haven’t chosen a web framework yet (is there anyone?), or if you’re falling out of love with your current web framework and you’re considering using a different one, you might be able to learn something from profiling an application running under various frameworks nonetheless, even if you ignore the raw speed of the framework itself’Here are the results:
  • http://compoundthinking.com/blog/index.php/2009/02/04/wsgi-and-cooperation/ (‘…The point of all this is that the wider python web world is seeing a huge increase in cross-polination of ideas, of working together on projects, and sharing code across major frameworks from TurboGears to Zope, to Pylons. And at the core of all this is the WSGI specification. WSGI may not be pefect, but it’s still great, because it provides a defined way for web framework developers to work together. And, that coupled with the fact that we’re all pretty friendly people, and we all like each other and want to work together on things, has created a renasance of sorts in python web tools world…’)
  • http://code.google.com/p/pyxer/ (‘Yet another Python Framework! The goal of this project to make web development as easy as possible to enable the developer to start quickly with a new project. This project should be distributable via PasteDeploy for normal servers and for Google App Engine (GAE), without the need of using different technologies and approaches. The Pyxer Server is a very simple Python Web Framework that aims to makes starting a new project as easy as it can be. It still works respecting the MVC concept but the files can be mixed in one directory. For a high end solution you should maybe consider using Pylons, Django, TurboGears and similar. This work is inspired by http://pythonpaste.org/webob/do-it-yourself.htmlTechnical background. The Google App Engine (GAE) in version 1.1 offers a very restricted Python environment and the developer as to ship arround a lot of limitations. Pyxer helps on this point by providing solutions that also work together with the WSGI Framework Paste by Ian Bicking. This way you get the best from both sides: GAE and Paste. To achieve this, some other common third party tools are used like WebOb and VirtualEnv also by Ian Bicking. The templating s based on Genshi. .‘)
  • http://groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.python.announce/browse_thread/thread/09cfe8decd549127/1382cac331ce7805?show_docid=1382cac331ce7805 (‘web2py 1.56 is out, including a new web site with better documentation http://www.web2py.com.
    • New features Include:
      =================
      – Authentication
      – Authorization (Role Based Access Controller)
      – CRUD
      – portable url fetch function
      – portable geocoding function
      – PEP8 compliant
      – Python 2.5 and Python 2.6 compliant
      – Runs on Jython (although without db drivers)
      – Runs on IronPython (although without CSV, db drivers and internal
      web-server)
      – DAL shortcuts
      – SQLFORM has default image preview
      – new generic.html view
      – more examples and documentation
      – always backward compatible ‘)
  • http://kiznet.fr/blog/2008/11/21/django–python-cest-plus-fort-que-toi/ (‘Aujourd »hui, je vais vous présenter Django, « Le framework web pour les perfectionnistes sous pression » ! Avouez que c »est déjà pas mal comme slogan. Je vais parler ici de mon expérience personnelle d’amateur qui pratique l »informatique sur son temps libre. Donc tout ce que je peux raconter ici peut apparaître totalement FAUX à un expert en la matière, mais bon, faut bien se lancer un jour hein 🙂 …J’ai ensuite installé Django en lui même (ce qui se résume à télécharger la version en cours de développement puis créer 2-3 liens symboliques, du gâteau quoi), puis paramétrer mon httpd.conf (de même, processus très simple grâce à la très bonne documentation très bien traduite par David Larlet. Résultat, en partant de rien, un framework fonctionnel disponible en production en tout juste 5 petites minutesBienvenue dans le monde merveilleux de Django! 🙂 Pour tes accents, vérifie que tu as bien créé ta base MySQL avec le bon encodage. Il y a en fait deux encodages qui interviennent: celui de la base et celui de la connexion client. Tu peux mettre les deux en UTF-8. L’encodage de la base détermine comment ton texte est stocké physiquement sur le disque; si tu mets un encodage non-universel, alors certains caractères ne pourront être stockés. L’encodage de la connexion client détermine comment ton texte est transféré physiquement entre le serveur SQL et ton applicatif. Là aussi, il est important que l’encodage choisi soit capable de gérer les caractères de ton texte, mais il est également très important que l’applicatif et le serveur SQL soient d’accord sur cet encodage (c’est une erreur que je vois trop souvent sur des sites PHP). Normalement Django pose tout seul les bons encodages sur la connexion client, donc de ce point de vue là ce n’est probablement pas un souci pour toi. Mais fais gaffe à l’encodage de la base. ‘)
  • http://www.screeley.com/entries/2008/aug/21/enterprise-django/ (‘…If there’s one thing I love about Alfresco it would be webscripts. They make it easy to retrieve, create and modify content from a repository RESTfully. Webscripts are also very technology agnostic, you can put just about anything on top. We looked at Symphony, Ruby on Rails and Django, but because I have a hammer and everything looks like a nail, we went with Django. This might have been short sighted. The developer working on this django-jython project only got Django running on Jython in TomCat 4 days ago. It also doesn’t help that the client asked if we misspelled banjo in our presentation. Needless to say there will be a few challenges going forward. Tech Stuff: If you have an existing Django project it takes less than an hour to make the conversion. Before you get started you will need three things: Java 6, Tomcat(I am using 5.5) and the Postgres JDBC. The initial install directions are here and to create the WAR the docs are here. The only issue I ran into was a Java class version issue, which is why you need Java 6. ‘)

A voir:

  • http://wiki.python.org/moin/WebFrameworks
  • http://mdp.cti.depaul.edu/ (‘web2pyTM Enterprise Web Framework.Free and open source full-stack enterprise framework for agile development of fast, secure and portable database-driven web-based applications. Written and programmable in Python.Version 1.56.1 (2009-02-05 11:49:10) Created by Massimo Di Pierro. © 2007-2009. ‘)
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Django_(web_framework)
  • http://www.django-fr.org/liens/ (‘La documentation officielle est complète mais ne suffit parfois pas à certaines spécificités, les liens présents sur cette page sont là pour combler ce manque. ‘)
  • http://plope.com/Members/chrism/repoze-bfg (‘…So, for the last few weeks (at the expense of much else), with a lot of help from Paul Everitt and Tres Seaver, I’ve been working on a new web framework. This framework is named (provisionally) repoze.bfg (« Big Fine Gun« ). It uses the Zope CA, and Zope interfaces, and a bunch of other Zope libraries, but doesn’t use the Z2 or Z3 publishers; it has its own publisher. It also does not use any form of Zope security; it implements its own security model. It has the same concept of views that Zope and Django have. Its development model is closer to Pylons’ or Django’s than it is to Zope’s. It uses the z3c.pt templating system, which is a reimplementation of ZPT, or you can also use XSL, or plug in whatever templating system you like really. It doesn’t assume any particular persistence mechanism; you provide your own (ZODB, relational, filesystem, etc); in a tip of the hat to Pylons, that’s considered an application decision. It depends heavily on a variety of Ian Bicking creations, including WebOb and Paste. It’s very small, currently clocking in at a little over 2000 lines of code, minus dependencies. That said, it does about what I want out of a web framework. It’s still in a pretty early stage, but it has definitely moved its way out of « toy » phase. We’ve managed to create several applications using the framework so far. The very first one was repoze.virginia , which is the application which serves up Repoze.org these days. It’s a simple file hierarchy publisher with slight dynamicism. The second one Paul wrote, and it’s named repoze.lxmlgraph , where he demonstrates how one might publish a website that was represented entirely by a single XML document. The third one is named repoze.cluegun , which is a port of Rocky Burt’s ClueBin application to repoze.bfg. That code runs the ClueGun website . Of the three, ClueGun is probably the most real-world app (albeit small). I’m sort of excited about it. It’s sort of like getting out of jail or something to be able to have your own web framework to write as you see fit. We’ll likely continue to develop applications using repoze.bfg, pushing features into the framework as we find them useful.’)
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pylons_(web_framework)
  • http://static.repoze.org/bfgdocs/ (‘repoze.bfg is a Python web application framework. It is inspired by Zope, and uses Zope libraries to do much of its work. However, it is simpler than any released version of Zope. repoze.bfg uses the WSGI protocol to handle request and responses.’)
    • http://static.repoze.org/bfgdocs/narr/introduction.html#similarities-to-other-frameworks (‘The repoze.bfg concept of traversal is inspired by Zope. Additionally, repoze.bfg uses the Zope Component Architecture (“CA”) internally, as do Zope 2, Zope 3, and Grok. Application repoze.bfg developers use either ZCML (an XML dialect, used in Zope) or decorators to perform various configuration tasks. The decorator support is provided by the Grok project. Like Pylons, repoze.bfg is mostly policy-free. It makes no assertions about which database you should use, and its built-in templating facilities are only for convenience. In essence, it only supplies a mechanism to map URLs to view code, along with a convention for calling those views. You are free to use third-party components in your application that fit your needs. Also like Pylons, repoze.bfg is heavily dependent on WSGI.The “Django docs state that Django is an “MTV” framework in their FAQ. This also happens to be true for repoze.bfg:‘)
    • http://static.repoze.org/bfgdocs/narr/introduction.html#differences-from-other-frameworks (‘ Like Zope, the repoze.bfg framework imposes slightly more control inversion upon application developers than other Python frameworks such as Pylons. For example repoze.bfg assumes that you’re wiling to resolve a URL to a context object before passing it to a view. Pylons and other Python “MVC” frameworks have no such intermediate step; they resolve a URL directly to a controller. Another example: using the repoze.bfg security subsystem assumes that you’re willing to attach an ACL to a context object; the ACL is checked by the framework itself instead of by user code, and access is permitted or denied by the framework itself rather than by user code. Such a task would typically be performed by user-space decorators in other Python web frameworks. Unlike application development using Zope, application developers don’t interact with the Zope Component Architecture (“CA”) very much during repoze.bfg application development. Instead, the repoze.bfg framework tends to “hide” most interaction with the CA behind special-purpose API functions. Also unlike Zope and unlike other “full-featured” frameworks such as Django, repoze.bfg makes no assumptions about what persistence mechanisms you want to use to build an application. Zope applications are typically reliant on ZODB; repoze.bfg allows you to build ZODB applications, but it has no reliance on the ZODB package. Likewise, Django tends to make the assumption that you’re going to want to store your application’s data in a relational database. repoze.bfg makes no such assumption; it allows you to use a relational database but doesn’t enourage or discourage an application developer about such a decision.’)
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grok_(web_framework) (‘ Grok is a web framework based on Zope 3 technology. The project was started in 2006 by a number of Zope 3 developers.Grok has since then seen regular releases. Its core technologies (Martian, grokcore.component) are also finding uptake in other Zope 3 and Zope 2 based projects. The primary motive behind Grok is to make the powerful, but not quite easily approachable Zope 3 technology more accessible and easier to use for newcomers and, at the same time, speed up application development, in accordance with the agile programming paradigm.To achieve this, Grok gives up some Zope 3 principles. Instead of using a strictly explicit, XML based configuration language (ZCML) like Zope 3 does, Grok uses Python code for component configuration, and has many implicit defaults and conventions so that you don’t have to have so much configuration, in the hope that it is easier to learn than standard Zope 3. Grok aims to be more similar in feel to popular Python web frameworks like TurboGears, Pylons and Django, while at the same time it retains much of Zope 3’s codebase and its component approach to development. ‘)

Posted in 2009, Ironpython, jython, package_management, python, Python Web Frameworks | Tagué: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Java : « Will Open-Sourcing Java Remove Competetive Corporate-Think? » de Bruce Eckel

Posted by patrick sur décembre 19, 2008

  • http://www.artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=244996 (« Will Open-Sourcing Java Remove Competetive Corporate-Think? The problem with public corporations is that, no matter what they say, « maximize quarterly profits » is the real mantra…Java was created in a company run by a hyper-competitive CEO and the whole culture around it has been competitive. Many decisions were made without the consumer (programmers) in mind, but with Sun’s apparent best interests in mind…Early on, the « write once, run everywhere » chant started and that justified everything. If you want to talk to something OS-specific, you can use JNI, right? What a nightmare. And the joke became « write once, test everywhere »…Sun, as is its habit, never learns from its mistakes. Sometime in the last couple of years, rumor has it that Adobe apparently extended the possibility of working with Sun so that Flex would integrate seamlessly with Java. This would seem like a best-of-all-worlds situation, to pal up with the folks who have been specializing in UI programming. Instead, that seems to be around the time that JavaFX was started (which even poached Flex’s « Fx »). The classic « not invented here » response is the standard reply of corporate competitive-think…Open-sourcing Java is not going to make it an open-source project. The culture that has built up around Java for over ten years is not going to change just by moving to a new license…A truly open-source programming language does not have shareholders to serve. It can only serve its actual customers, the programmers who are consuming the language. For example, Python has always been about « what do you want to do today? » If you want to create a cross-platform app, no problem. And if you want to talk directly to the OS, that’s been made as easy as possible. This makes sense because Python is an « enabling » language — it’s about helping you do what you need to do, rather than telling you what you can and can’t do (these comments also apply to Ruby and other enabling languages, but I only occasionally tinker with Ruby so I can’t speak authoritatively about it).Python, after thrashing around with many different approaches, also solved the « interfacing to native code » problem. In Python 2.5, ctypes were added. Now you only have to say « there’s the DLL, connect to it as efficiently as possible » and it does it. And amazingly, the DLLs are the only things that are different on different platforms; your Python code can be the same. That’s the right solution to the problem. (When Jython 2.5 comes out, I’ve heard it will have ctypes working so that may be the reasonable alternative to JNI)…Java won’t die. But the adoption of new Java versions and features is going to continue to slow. People have been bitten too many times. Java lost its status of being a leader awhile ago, and it’s now a legacy language — it’s just taking awhile for everyone to realize it…Full disclosure: My consulting contract (mostly speaking, some free-form writing) with Adobe expired around last May (and yes, Adobe is a full-on corporation with all of the problems that implies — but according to rumor it was Adobe that suggested the liaison with Sun); I decided on my own that Flex is a good solution for UIs, both before and after that contract. Also, James Ward and I just published our coauthored book (written under our own steam, not part of the Adobe contract) First Steps in Flex. I’m working on an open-source book on Python 3. And before you say I’ve gone totally anti-Java, I also organize The Java Posse Roundup with The Java Posse (so think « tough love »).« )

Voir:

  • http://wiki.debian.org/Java
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IcedTea (‘IcedTea is a software development and integration project launched by Red Hat in June 2007.[1] The goal is to make the OpenJDK software which Sun Microsystems released as free software in 2007 usable without requiring any other software that is not free software. For Red Hat, this would make it possible to add OpenJDK to the Fedora Linux distribution, as well as other distributions. This goal has been met, and a version of IcedTea based on OpenJDK was packaged with Fedora 8 in November 2007. April 2008 saw the first release[2] of a new variant, IcedTea6 which is based on Sun’s build drops of OpenJDK6, a fork of the OpenJDK with the goal of being compatible with the existing JDK6. This was released in Ubuntu and Fedora in May 2008. The IcedTea package in these distributions has been renamed to OpenJDK using the OpenJDK trademark notice‘)
  • http://packages.debian.org/sid/java-package (‘This program currently works with the following Java(TM) 2 Runtime Environments and Development Kits:
     * Sun Microsystems(TM) 1.4, 5 and 6 Standard Edition
     * IBM(TM) 1.3, 1.4, 5 and 6 Standard Edition
     * Blackdown Java-Linux 1.3 and 1.4 Standard Edition')

Posted in 2008, java, jython, python | Tagué: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Des nouvelles de python : pycon2008, python 3000, jython, LINQ, concurrency, django

Posted by patrick sur mars 31, 2008

Après presque 3 semaines sans blogger, quelques nouvelles de Pycon 2008

http://www.python.org/doc/essays/ppt/pycon2008/Py3kAndYou.pdf (« Guido nous parle de Python 3000 dans un document de 21 pages. Quelques extraits: Why Py3k: “Open source needs to move or die”,What’s In It For You: More predictable Unicode handling, Makes “Python fits in your brain” more true, TOOWTDI (There’s Only One Way To Do It — The Zen of Python),  There are tools to help you switch!,  Don’t bother with the trivial stuff though:  The 2to3 tool will handle this, In 2.6:  Use bytes and b’…’ for all data,  Use unicode for all text, The Role of Python 2.6:  Many 3.0 features backported,  More volunteers needed! Transition Strategies:  Port to 2.6 first,  Using 2to3 whenever you can, Release Schedule:  The 3.0final release is now scheduled for September 3, 2008, Wrapping Up:  Have fun with the new features,  Enjoy fewer bugs, traps, surprises, Resources: http://docs.python.org/dev/3.0/whatsnew/3.0.html ,  PEPs: http://python.org/dev/peps/pep-3000/,  Subversion:  svn.python.org/view/python/branches/py3k/ )

http://www.artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=227041 (« I’d like to take this opportunity to remind you of a really important issue that I neglected to mention in the talk: Don’t change your APIs incompatibly when porting to Py3k.
Yes, you heard that right: even though Python 3.0 is changing incompatibly, I implore you (especially if you’re maintaining a library that’s used by others) not to make incompatible changes to your API. If you have make API changes, do them before you port to 3.0 — release a version with the new API for Python 2.5, or 2.6 if you must. (Or do it later, after you’ve released a port to 3.0 without adding new features.
« )

http://www.sauria.com/blog/2008/03/20/pycon-2008/ (« …Raymond’s talk gives a cost model for the core containers, and having an understanding of that model is important for folks who are writing Python programs. It’s also useful for developers of alternate Python implementations because it allows them to follow suit or to diverge and (hopefully) document the places where the cost model is different. My next favorite talk was Jim Baker’s “More Iterators in Action”. I missed the talk given last year, but I liked this one. Jim hit two of my favorite topics, language integrated query (LINQ) (albeit without the DSL), and concurrency. There was a lot of interest in concurrency this year, which warms my heart, because I see high-level/dynamic languages and concurrency as the chocolate and peanut butter…If I was surprised about the jump in size of PyCon, I was even more surprised by the amount of energy around Jython. At most of the previous PyCon’s that I attended, people would mention Jython, and either be sorry that it was too out of date to consider, or be just plain dismissive of it. This year there was none of that. People were very interested in Jython. I was really surprised by how much interest there was, and by some of the people who were interested. It was certainly a nice feeling to sit in the sprint room and occasionally have people pop in to ask if such and such was running in Jython yet, or did Jython support X because package Y needed it…If I was surprised about the jump in size of PyCon, I was even more surprised by the amount of energy around Jython. At most of the previous PyCon’s that I attended, people would mention Jython, and either be sorry that it was too out of date to consider, or be just plain dismissive of it. This year there was none of that. People were very interested in Jython. I was really surprised by how much interest there was, and by some of the people who were interested. It was certainly a nice feeling to sit in the sprint room and occasionally have people pop in to ask if such and such was running in Jython yet, or did Jython support X because package Y needed it »)

http://nedbatchelder.com/blog/200803/pycon_2008_notes.html (« I got back from Pycon last night. I’d taken notes on all the sessions I attended. They’re kind of sketchy, and I don’t know if they’ll be of any use to anyone else, but I figured I’d put them up anyway. My apologies to speakers whom I have crudely paraphrased here. The quality of these notes varies as my energy level waxed and waned. »)

http://us.pycon.org/2008/conference/talks/

http://us.pycon.org/2008/conference/talks/?filter=django

http://us.pycon.org/2008/conference/talks/?filter=concurrency

http://us.pycon.org/2008/conference/talks/?filter=google%20spreadsheets

http://www.artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=227496 (« I think I’ve been using Python for close to 12 years now, and it’s been my favorite language for much of that time (I’ve given 2 keynotes and one or two talks at the Python conferences. It’s by far my favorite language to consult in). Long enough to get used to the fact that people typically don’t get it (« Yes, I always indent my code like that anyway, but I could never use a language that REQUIRED it!…I’m not into Django myself; I’m more interested in the flexibility of the approach taken by TurboGears 2 (I just spent a significant amount of time cleaning up the TurboGears 2 Wiki Tutorial). However, I think the combination of choices offered by Django + TurboGears covers people’s needs better than a single monolithic approach, and Django appears to be the right solution for a large portion of the applications out there….Regarding Django: It’s great to see Django picking up so much steam. I’ve done a few Django projects and I’m really impressed by it. It really takes advantage of Python’s strenghts. Anybody thinking about creating a web application should check it out. Highly recommended.« )

Posted in 2008, jython, python | Tagué: | Leave a Comment »

Des nouvelles de python: Sun supporte Jython et Python, Django, Mailman3 (MM3, REST), Barry Warsaw reçoit le prix Pizzigati pour GNU/Mailman

Posted by patrick sur mars 6, 2008

Jython et Sun

http://ironpython-urls.blogspot.com/2008/03/ironpython-has-serious-competition-sun.html (« In September 2006 Sun hired two JRuby developers to improve the story of dynamic languages on the JVM. This was seen by many as both long overdue and a response to Microsoft developing IronPython (and the Dynamic Language Runtime) for .NET. As Jython has been around for longer than JRuby, many in the Python community wondered why Sun weren’t supporting Python. Finally they have answered, by hiring Ted Leung and Jython lead developer Frank Wierzbicki.« )

http://www.sauria.com/blog/2008/03/03/the-sun-is-going-to-shine-on-python/ (…Over the years, I’ve met many people at Sun who understand a collaborative development style. Many of those folks are committers on Apache projects…How serious is Sun about dynamic languages and how deep does that support go? Sun is (finally?) very serious about this. As part of Sun’s new direction, Sun wants to give developers the ability to use whatever tool sets they want. Ruby, Python, PHP, Java. On or off OpenSolaris. On or off the JVM. There is an official project, John Rose’s DaVinci Machine Frank Wierzbicki, the maintainer of Jython, started at Sun last Monday, so there will be at least two of us working on Python related stuff. That includes Jython, Python support for Netbeans, and some other stuff that we haven’t quite figured out yet. We definitely will be looking for things that we can do to support CPython and the Python language as a whole. This is not just about Python on on the JVM. Sun will try to make its platforms, OpenSolaris and the JVM, the best place to develop and deploy Python applications. But at the moment that’s a goal and not a reality, so there is lots to do. )

http://fwierzbicki.blogspot.com/2008/02/jythons-future-looking-sunny.html (« …So by now you’ve probably guessed it: Sun Microsystems has hired me to work full time on Jython. They have also hired Ted Leung to represent the wider world of Python at Sun. I don’t think I can overstate just how excited I am about this. For a long time now I’ve been obsessed with Jython. Now I will be able to let my obsession take over completely…I have to especially thank Tim Bray, who has been pushing the dynamic language thing at Sun for quite a long time. I’m sure the warm welcome that I got at Sun was in no small part due to the enormous success of the JRuby work that has been going on there, so thanks to Charles Nutter and Thomas Enebo for their work. Also thanks to the many folks at Sun who have been pushing for this, including Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart. And of course thanks to all of you who use, contribute to, and talk about Jython. Jython is above all things a community effort. We should all share in the excitement. Hurray!« )

http://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/200x/2008/03/03/Python-at-Sun (« So, as of this morning, noted Pythonista Ted Leung and Jython lead Frank Wierzbicki are joining Sun. Plus, we’re sponsoring PyCon and have applied to join the Python Software Foundation (it turns out you not only have to contribute, you have to get voted in). So, what are these guys going to be working on? I’m not sure. While we’re using Python internally for OpenSolaris IPS, nobody would call us real experts on the language. So my opinion is that Frank and Ted need build bridges to the community and figure out how we can help; if we can pitch in as well with Python as we have with Ruby, that’d be a win/win I’d say. Quick Python trivia question: Near as I can tell, Guido works half-time on Python over at Google. Is there anyone in the world, aside from Frank and Ted, getting paid to work full-time on Python ?« )

Django

  • http://www.jacobian.org/writing/2008/feb/21/sailing-on/ (« …However, I’ve been offered every Open Source developer’s dream job. Starting in March, I’ll be spending the majority of my time working on Django….So what exactly will I be doing? My job will entail a bit of internal-only closed-source development, but nearly everything I write will be Open Source. Most of my time will be spent improving Django. In the short term that’ll mean fixing tickets, working on new features, getting active branches finished and merged to trunk, and getting a one-point-omg release out the doorLast year I spent a few days in Boulder helping the Front Range Pythoneers kick off the Oracle backend for Django. It was a huge amount of fun, and I’m going to make myself available to other groups wanting to working on other similar problemsI can’t wait to spend my days hacking on Django. The best part is that this isn’t the only piece of good news about Django I’ll get to share this year. Stay tuned: 2008 is going to be huge« )

Mailman 3

  • http://wiki.list.org/display/DEV/REST+Interface (« I’m interested in working on a REST-style interface for controlling Mailman. One thought: should the web UI be written atop such a REST interface? Pro: it would nicely enforce decoupling the UI and the Mailman engine, and be a good test that the REST interface supports enough functionality. Con: adds an extra layer…I’m really keen on exploring this because I do think the decoupling will be a big win. It’ll let us distribute a turnkey, standalone u/i for those who want something working out of the box, but it’ll also let integrators use the core Mailman engine in their own sites. And it won’t limit you to just Python web frameworks (A sketch of the REST interface is in the wiki at http://wiki.list.org/display/DEV/REST+Interface . It’s written from the 2.1/2.2 point of view; I don’t know if mm3 reworks the basic objects so much that the REST interface no longer applies.). This interface isn’t intended to be exposed to the Internet at large, so there’s no mention of access control. It would be used as a back-end, on top of which the existing Mailman interface, or a fancy GUI application, or administrative scripts, could be built
    I think if we’re careful we can get pretty close. Ideally, we’d have
    the same REST api for both, which would give us a nice migration path, but I don’t yet know if that’s feasible. MM3 does have a more elaborate data model than MM2, but OTOH, everything is formally declared in Zope-style interfaces (and thoroughly tested… woohoo!). One thing that we have to figure out is how to represent all the metadata that currently lives in the Mailman.Gui package of 2.1/2.2. I think any web interface acting through the REST api will want that basic information, e.g. the brief and detailed descriptions of the mailing attributes (the VARHELP). I’m sure there’s a clear way to publish that through the REST api, but it might have an impact on the format used. I like JSON a lot, but html or xml might be more amenable to that type of data. OTOH, it’s all read-only so it might make sense to split it into two trees of information.
    « )

Mailman

  • http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/mailman-announce(« 
    I realize that I’ve been remiss in announcing this. My apologies. I have been awarded the 2008 Pizzigati Prize for Public Interest
    Computing for GNU Mailman. http://www.pizzigatiprize.org/
    I am deeply honored to win this prize because I believe very strongly
    in Mailman’s role in helping people communicate and organize. I want
    to thank all of you who have supported me and Mailman over the years, and I want to let you know that I am as excited as ever about where Mailman is going. One of the most satisfying aspects of this project for me has been meeting you, the users, developers and contributors to Mailman, both online and face-to-face. I’m looking forward to meeting the Pizzigati family and having some time to spend with them learning about Anthony’s remarkable life, sadly cut too short. So again, thank you all and I’m looking forward to the next 10 years of GNU Mailman!Cheers,
    – -Barry »)
  • http://www.pizzigatiprize.org/news/press_releases/barry_warsaw_named_second_annual_winner_of_the_10,000_pizzigati_prize.html (« San Francisco, January 30, 2008— Tides Foundation announces the winner of the second annual $10,000 Pizzigati Prize. Barry Warsaw, a software developer dedicated to identifying and solving the technological problems that confront social change movements, has won the Antonio Pizzigati Prize for Software in the Public Interest.
    Barry Warsaw is being recognized for his work as the lead developer of GNU Mailman, the open source application that hundreds of nonprofits around the world are now using to manage electronic mail discussions and e-newsletter lists. The Pizzigati Prize — an award program launched two years ago by Tides Foundation’s Florence and Frances Family Fund — aims to honor individuals who, in the spirit of open source computing, fashion outstanding applications that help nonprofits become more effective in their ongoing social change efforts. “Barry Warsaw has displayed, over the years, a powerful personal commitment to the ideals behind the Pizzigati Prize,” notes Jason Sanders, Tides Philanthropic Advisor who coordinates the prize competition. “His work has demonstrated vision and inspired innovation in public interest computing
    .« )

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